Sunday, October 18, 2015

The Hangover: marathon recovery

I've run the Chicago Marathon 3 times now, and each race has been a completely different experience. You can read all 3 recaps here, here, and here. Recovery each time has been completely different as well. After my first marathon, my feet hurt so bad, I couldn't walk on them the next day. Last year, I felt pretty good after my marathon. I went to work the following day and manned the sick clinic. This year, I took the day off following the marathon and I was glad I did that. It's like I knew ahead of time that I'd need it. While I was no more sore than usual after a long run, I felt hung over. Like I went on a bender all weekend and drank myself silly.

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I didn't sleep great Sunday night, and when I finally rolled out of bed on Monday morning, I made my coffee but headed very quickly to the couch, where I spent most of the day. I had what I can only describe as the "heebie-jeebies"--the yucky feeling I used to get when I overindulged. I did overindulge, in a sense. On miles. 26.2 miles is really far. 26.2 mile in the heat is something else.

I worked hard at drinking lots of water and eating all the food. Once the heebie-jeebies subsided, my appetite returned with a vengeance. I was hungry--no, I was rungry. I had the runchies. Hey, I recently read that running doesn't increase endorphins as much as it stimulates endocannabinoids! Yep, you read that right. Runners' high, indeed...

Oh dear, I'm on a tangent again....

Back to my recovery story. As I replenished my depleted body, I began to feel more like myself again.

On Tuesday, I was greeted at work with this on my office door. My coworkers all congratulated me and indulged my retelling of my marathon glory. I do work with some awesome people!


But of course, the downside of going back to work is that even though I did this amazing thing, running 26.2 miles, I couldn't broadcast it to everyone that I saw. Oh, but I wanted to. Tell me this hasn't happened to you. I was so proud of my accomplishment, and I couldn't share it with anyone! Nope, I had to put on my professional face and be empathetic to all the families I care for. Because when they bring their kids to see me, it's all about them. As it should be. But I won't lie. I wanted to tell everyone. I didn't, but I wanted to.  I wasn't ready to stop basking in my post-marathon glow. Even though this was #3. It never gets old...

Don't you want everyone to know when you've accomplished something this huge? I wore my Chicago Marathon race shirt all day on Thursday, and when I was at Target, another shopper asked me where something was. When I told her I didn't know, she told me she thought I worked there because I was wearing a red shirt.

Oh, so humbling.

Here's the thing: You run a marathon, and you cross a finish line. All along the route there are spectators cheering you on, telling you to keep going, telling you how strong you look, calling your name (or "go USA", which is what I heard). Thousands of people volunteer to hand you water, Gatorade, sponges, what have you, and you take them, throwing the discards on the ground to be cleaned up by more volunteers. Little kids put their hands out to you and you high five them. You push the power buttons on every sign you see. When you cross that finish line, a volunteer puts the medal around your neck and makes you feel like you won the race. People congratulate you. Photographers line the course, snapping your every move. You are amazing. You are a rock star.

Oh, that finish line feeling....
And then you go back to real life. Where your family wants dinner. Your son's car broke down again. The dog threw up on the carpet. There's 6 loads of laundry to fold. No one wants to see your pictures. Your husband asks you to put your medal away.

That's when the real hangover begins.

Not the physical hangover like I described above. What I'm talking about is what happens when the soreness subsides. When the physical symptoms subside. There's no more goal to chase. No more training. No more planning. No more marathon. No more accolades.

And for some, there's reflecting back on what might have been a disappointing race.

Some call it the post-marathon blues. How does a runner beat that? How can a runner prevent feeling empty after the dust settles? What to do when the endorphins endocannabinoids go away?

-Bask in your achievement. Not everyone will understand your need to talk about what you've accomplished, so write a recap. Even if it is for your eyes only. I can honestly say that I've probably read my race recap 50 times since I've written it. It never gets old. I look back on Sunday and am astonished at how I ran that race. Personally, it seems like it was someone else's story! Re-reading what I wrote reminds me of how far I have come as a runner. No one is going to tell me that (except my coach). There's nothing wrong with feeling good about yourself. Look at your race day pictures. Even if you don't buy them, those pictures are another reminder of what you've achieved.

Chinatown. Mile 22. Still running.
-Analyze what went well and what went wrong. You should do this whether or not it was a great race or a disappointing race. There's always something to be learned and always something to feel good about, no matter how you did. I had that bad Chicago Marathon in 2011, and I was so upset with that race, I couldn't even tell people that I ran it. Hindsight is 20/20, and when I look back on that race, there was a lot to learn. There was also the fact I ran a marathon. In all my disappointment, I negated that achievement. It just took me a while to get over myself. If you had a disappointing race, don't beat yourself up too badly. Remind yourself that not everything during the race was under your control. And sorry folks, but no race is perfect. I bet even the winners have things they want to improve upon.

-Eat well and get plenty of sleep. This goes without saying but after you run a long distance race, your immune system is taxed, making you more susceptible to illness. This is your time to pamper yourself and replenish. Now isn't the time to gorge on junk food and all the other things you gave up during your training. Look at your recovery as mile 27--this is the final phase of your training.

-Don't rush back into running. Give yourself time to recover. Sure, you hate to throw all that fitness to waste. And you don't have to. Just go easy on yourself. According to this article, it can take up to 2 weeks for the inflammation in your muscles and 7-10 days for the cellular damage to resolve. Hal Higdon has a return to running plan you can follow (there's also a half-marathon plan). Seasoned runners can listen to their bodies and slowly return to running. While you are waiting to run, you can do cross-training activities--I did some yoga this week, which felt great.

Triangle pose stretches me out in all directions!
I also went out on my bike. Dare I say I rode leisurely?

Retracing my running route and taking in some of nature's glory!
-Sign up for another race. Not tomorrow, mind you. Once you've given yourself time to recover from the marathon, pick out another race to run. For fall marathoners, a Turkey Trot is perfect timing since those races usually happen about 4-6 weeks after most of the fall marathons. I signed up for a virtual 5k run the week after Chicago--I wasn't sure if I'd run or walk. I ended up running it slow and easy since my legs felt good.

Jumping for joy--that first post-marathon run!
I also have 2 spring races on the calendar, the Sarasota Half Marathon and the Big Sur International Marathon, so I have plenty of incentive to give my legs time to recover. I'm not planning on DNSing either of those. For the next 12 weeks, I plan on running easy. I may add some distance back in later this year, but for now I'm going to give these legs and feet a little bit of a break.

-Start tackling that "after the marathon" to do list. I already got my dog groomed this week, and I've been doing some purging of the piles of junk that accumulated all over the house. Yep, I fed my family and did the laundry. My medal is hanging up on my bedroom mirror. That broken down car? That's a sore subject. I think it's time for the junkyard, but my husband disagrees. Anyways, there's still a lot to do and now is the time to attack those tasks.

She got her haircut. Next up is me. We should have done a 2 for 1...
What do you do to recover after a marathon? How do you fight off the post marathon blues? Have you set any goals for races?

I'm linking up with Holly at HoHoRuns and Tricia at MissSippiPiddlin for their Weekly Wrap! Check it out!

96 comments :

  1. Ah the post race blues. Yup, been there, ran that. I remember when I ran my first marathon in 2012, Chicago no less, and I returned to work the next day and NO ONE CARED about my amazing accomplishment. It broke my heart briefly, but then I remembered I ran that race for me NOT them. Great pointers on beating the blues...My goal THIS year was to get faster, which I didn't do...so I am revisiting that goal in the near future. <3 GREAT job, Wendy. You rocked your race!

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    1. I'm really happy this time around...no post race blues! Plus I already have something else to train for. There's something to be said for having goals.

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  2. Wow Wendy!!!! This post is filled with soooo much wisdom....(and so many amazing pictures....) but every word of it is good information. While I haven't and the post full experience, I remember that after I ran the Nike Women's Half in San Fran one year ago on October 19th, I wanted to talk to everyone about it. While we were in SF, the whole city was revolving around the race and everyone was aware of it, and then we got back to LA and all I wanted to do was talk about what an amazing experience it was.... and I got back to town of a fully neglected to do list. Anyway, I LOVE this post.... and your work decorating your office door like that... as far as I'm concerned having coworkers who did that for you is better than a BQ anyway! LOVE this post....maybe it's my favorite one you've ever done (so many good ones to choose from)

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    1. Thank you, Paria! I think this third marathon was the charm...the race where even tho I didn't get my BQ, I used all the wisdom I gained from all the races I've done to run a really smart race. I'm not scared of the marathon anymore, altho the distance is still a little intimidating!

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  3. Thanks for sharing... its true so many people talk about the marathon itself, but the post marathon I have heard can be hard... which is why I signed up for a destination race about 8 weeks after my marathon to be sure I had something to look forward to. Have a great week !

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    1. I think it's a great idea to have something on the calendar after the marathon!

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  4. What a great post! I ran a marathon relay yesterday, and watching all of the marathon runners was truly inspirational! I can't even imagine the recovery. Kudos to you for completing the race - AGAIN!

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    1. Thank you! And congrats on the relay! Did you get marathon fever?

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  5. I experience that difficulty sleeping after a big endurance event, too. Has happened after all my marathons and half Iron distance tris. Glad to hear you are recovering well. I, too, will be running a turkey trot. There is a 5 miler local to me that will be a good test of run fitness. I ran it last year so I will have that comparison. I will also be able to see where I'm at after about 5 weeks with my new coach. Congrats again, Wendy. It has been amazing to follow your journey and I can't wait to hear about what is next!

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    1. That whole sleeping thing is the worst! It happens to me every time I do a distance race. I'm finally 'catching up' on my sleep.

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  6. I have just been SO tired since my marathon last weekend. Between 4 halfs and my full, I feel like I've been training all year. It feels a little weird to not have a training plan to follow, and now that I'm not sore anymore I'm trying to figure out my plans for keeping up my fitness while not officially training for anything. I do MUCH better with a schedule to follow, so I may need to make something up. :)

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    1. I was just reflecting on that with my mom--since I already have 2 races on the calendar for next year, I'm feeling a lot less lost than I usually do after a big race!

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  7. There is such a buildup for running a marathon. It's something you focus on for such a long period of time that naturally I think there has got to be a let down period. Yeah, that back to the real world thing is pretty humbling sometimes. Your co-workers were so sweet to decorate the door! I had a co-worker give me a gift once for good luck before a half marathon. I thought that was pretty cool. Your recovery time will be over before you know it and you'll be back to training. It will feel so good! Thanks for linking up!

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    1. I'm going to enjoy my time off. Looking forward to just running!

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  8. You definitely deserve to bask in the glory of your marathon! I love rereading my race recaps and remembering my fun times, too. And like you, I mainly write them for me and my friends who ran with me. It's just an added bonus when others appreciate reading them.

    BTW, I'm thinking of running the Chicago Spring Half Marathon. Have you run it? Thoughts?

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    1. That race is my one and only DNS! I was in the boot with a stress fracture for that one. I did spectate and I thought it was a great race!

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    2. Good to know that it looked like a good race from a spectators standpoint. Thanks!

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  9. Race recaps are so cool and so different and for me can be hard to write, you do a good job of telling your story! You had such a big race, enjoy that downtime the best you can! So nice that your coworkers decorated for you, that is cool! My coworkers know I run but they don't say much about it or ask. I like the hangover reference, funny!

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    1. The work thing was nice because no one there runs--they always ask me politely about it and I try not to gush--I can tell when I've gone overboard when the eyes glaze over!

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  10. Awesome advice and great recap! I'm kind of enjoying the down time esp right before the holiday season (UGH). Chicago was fantastic--hot but fantastic. And you are right about our husbands-they don't want to look at our pictures. LOL

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    1. Glad it isn't just me! I'm starting to plan for Big Sur and even tho he told me he'd come with, he's so not on board...

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  11. You know one thing I like about race recaps is every one is different. Even if you ran the exact same race it's different for you as it was for me. I hope you realize how helpful these words are to someone like me training for a marathon. That is very sweet what your Co workers did. I many times feel like mine know more about me an my running goals than my family. The hubs is great most of the time but I know he gets tire of hearing about it. As far as my other family, most of them dont even ask stupid non runner questions anymore. You did an amazing thing an what others think does not take away that one bit. Enjoy your recovery! As always thank you for linking up with us. I think the new time fits well. :)

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    1. I have read so many recaps on Chicago and while they were all different for this race, the one theme I noticed is that every struggled as the day warmed up. So that made me feel better about my troubles! Misery loves company...

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  12. I think I've got a case of the post marathon blues. Great tips! I'm thinking about trying the lottery for Chicago. You did awesome!

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    1. Chicago is a great race! The only thing about it is that the weather is unpredictable--sometimes right up to the start of the race!

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  13. What a great assessment of the post-race emotions, particularly about going back to work! A marathon has such intense buildup and it can be weird when it's over. I've definitely gotten the post-race blues before. And I agree 100% with getting life and house things done...I always slack off on that. Stuff during peak training. Have a good week!

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    1. Reality bites, doesn't it? Especially if you've run a marathon...

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  14. I've never had marathon blues, but I do get the urge, a strong one, to get more bang for my marathon endurance and sign up for another one SOON. The sane side of me has resisted that urge.

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    1. Funny how that happens....remember that Turkey Trot last year?

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  15. again, we are on the same wave length! I have often compared that finish line euphoria to that of childbirth (well, actually to the moment you first hold the child you birthed LOL). You feel on top of the world, proud of your accomplishment, and completely exhausted from what just happened. After the months of prep work, there is a bit of emptiness and "What now?" And, like the morning after a long night of "celebrating" there is that hungover feeling as well. It's all good ;-)

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    1. I use that childbirth reference a lot! I can't think of anything else I've done that has been so grueling, yet so rewarding and amazing!

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  16. It's the honeymoon hangover/post-wedding blues as well. A huge part of it is simply not knowing how to answer: what do I do with myself now? It is always good to have a plan afterwards! So many people forget about that.

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    1. Or after the honeymoon when you ask, is this all there is? You're right, it's good to have a plan...

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  17. not sure what it is but your post is playing audio - I couldn't find it on the page to turn it off!! anyway, I've only run one marathon and definitely got post marathon blues. My legs took awhile to recover and I sorta hated running for a long time. I was on a train to NYC for a work event not even 2 days later so completely felt the back to reality hangover!

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    1. Thanks for the heads up! I turn the sound of my computer and didn't know...it was that badge from the Active Times. I removed it.

      I only had the post marathon blues after my first marathon--I was so disappointed after that one.

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  18. You story about wanting to tell everyone you ran a marathon reminds me of the meme "How do you know someone runs marathons? Don't worry, they'll tell you." Yes, I want to tell everyone I ran a marathon too! Or even if it is a short little race, if I did really well, I went to tell! Thank goodness for FB and our blogs. :) I could tell my students but they don't care. They asked me if I won the Boston Marathon. Um, no. Then they wonder what place I came in. Ummmm..... 25 thousand and something!!??? They are soooo not impressed.

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    1. Last year, someone asked me what place I came in after I ran Chicago! Like you, I was like ummm, 21,000 or something? This year, I could say that I came in 17,000..

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  19. I love that your office mates are so supportive of you! I had some of the same feelings after my big summer race. I do think it was more mental for me and real life comes roaring back the next morning and you have to still perform your roles. I guess that's why we keep signing up for more so we can hold onto the race highs right?

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    1. I agree. I can only imagine how I'll feel after Big Sur! My husband is doing his best to burst my bubble tho...isn't that crazy? I call him Debbie Downer. Wah wah....

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  20. You should be able to wear that medal at home for as long as you want!!!!
    I'll go back and read my recap sometimes and it was years ago at this point. It's sad that not everyone understands... but I get it :-) And I'm sure most of your readers do.
    You did a really cool thing :-)

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    1. I really wanted to wear it to work. How obnoxious is that? LOL!

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  21. You definitely earned being able to bask in your accomplishment. Running a marathon is no joke, and you should be able to celebrate for as long as you would like to. Wear that medal proudly for as long as you want to. :)

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    1. I'm right there with you--it's the people around me who are stealing my joy!!! Husband, I'm talking to you...

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  22. Being done with a marathon is such a weird feeling. I always look forward to some time off during those last few weeks, but then once the race is over I always miss having the structure of a training plan. It is nice to start looking forward to other races and make goals. I love talking about my race at work! I definitely wore my race shirt last year after Philly...if that wasn't enough of a sign than I am sure my hobbling around really pointed it out!

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    1. I was going to wear my race shirt but since I work with the public (I'm a nurse practitioner) that could get a little weird...and our patients seem to complain about the most random things.

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  23. I always feel like after a big race, everyone I run into or just pass on the street should just KNOW how awesome. Haha - if only that's the way the world worked. The glory is awesome for a bit and then it's back to reality, but sometimes that's nice, too. It means no more hours out running on a weekend or worrying that 1 missed run will mess up all my training. Congrats again on the race! Now go enjoy your recovery!

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    1. I'm enjoying it, for sure! Especially since i know I have to ramp back up after the holidays for my spring races.

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  24. This is SOOOOO true, Wendy; thanks for sharing this post and the links for post-marathon recovery, as well. I really do want to look at people at work and go, "What the hell is wrong with you? I just ran a MARATHON and you're asking me what?!!" I'm so glad that your co-workers did recognize your accomplishment; I had to laugh at the Target incident, though. That is classic. Congratulations to you; at least your runner friends know what a HUGE deal this is!!! :)

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    1. Isn't that Target incident the funniest and saddest thing at the same time? And yesterday, the butcher at Whole Foods told me about his friend who ran a 5k in 1:30--when I looked at him funny, he told me it was 13 miles. Oh, a half marathon, right...non-runners...

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  25. If I finished a marathon I would tell every single person I met on the street about it! HA HA I am so happy that your coworkers made a big deal over you...you deserve it! :)

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    1. You really feel like you want to, for sure!

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  26. I used to feel blue after tackling a big goal like a marathon or Ironman. But now I actually enjoy that time when I actually have time. It's when I have my best ideas because instead of saying "there's not time to do that" I find myself with a whole lot of time to do a whole lot of things. Good luck in getting through this period, and enjoy it without feeling the need to fill it up again!

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    1. I always feel blue after a bad race, but I'm not feeling that way now!

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  27. i think i said the phrase "after the marathon" ten times yesterday. love your coworkers support!! and yes, the only natural thing to do after a marathon is TALK ONLY ABOUT THE MARATHON! :)

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    1. And next week at this time you'll be talking only about the marathon!!!

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  28. Yup, we are all rock stars one day, then back to the daily grind the next! I took seven days off completely and started again today by running two miles this morning. I signed up for the Hot Chocolate 15k in three weeks which is a race to look forward to since it shares the start and finish lines with the marathon. Oh yeah, we also get to run on the same south Michigan Ave. portion as the marathon, albeit in reverse. Agree, that it's a little soon to be racing post-marathon, but I can't resist being back out on the course!

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    1. Yeah, but Pete, it's the Hot Chocolate! I ran that one a few years ago--it was a cluster-- and I vowed never again. Although I've heard that they've improved it with start corrals and all. I'll wait for your recap! I do get that need to get back out there, tho!

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    2. Ha, ha, yes. I didn't have to wait in the cold for three hours at the HC packet pickup three years ago, therefore I missed that cluster. I can understand that the majority of people who went through that would never want to run it again. It wasn't enjoyable to get into my corral last year as there was almost some pushing and shoving as the corrals were closing. It's also pricey for so short of a race and I have to go to McCormick Place for packet pickup for a 15k which is a drag. Otherwise it's great! Ha! :)

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  29. So awesome of your coworkers to recognize your accomplishment!! Your post is so right on! Haven't done a full marathon but even after half marathons it's the same. You feel like a rockstar and want to tell everyone but when all is done, it's back to reality. Races are such a rush! It's the best reason to keep signing up for more! I am definitely trying for Chicago next year!

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    1. I thought that after my halfs but after running a marathon--well, nothing compares to that feeling! I don't know how many more I'll do--Big Sur may be it for me--and I know I'll miss that feeling of crossing the finish line after such a grueling event!

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  30. "There's 6 loads of laundry to fold. No one wants to see your pictures. Your husband asks you to put your medal away." LOL!! This is so perfect and true! Congrats on your finish and for knowing how to recover physically and mentally! I'd love to run Chicago next year!

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    1. It's kind of sad, but there it is....the life of a marathon runner! I hope you get to run Chicago!

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  31. Hey, I still bask in the glow of marathons I ran 15 years ago! :-). Physically, I always thought of recovery like a reverse taper. That slowly gets you back up to being ready to train again. My husband and I ran almost all the same races, though not usually together. But that meant we could talk to each other about our accomplishments and running in general non-stop without either of us getting bored.

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    1. You should bask in all your accomplishments! And yes I agree with the reverse taper.

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  32. This was so interesting to read, because as I was on my way to work this morning after my half marathon yesterday, I was thinking "well, now what" and "I wish I still felt as excited as I did yesterday." Life just goes on. So I decided today, that if possible, I will always take the next day off from work, so I can have that one more day of glory. Congrats on your finish at Chicago!

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    1. I'm so glad I took that day off this year. I got to bask for one more day!

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  33. That race hangover is real & awful. I always say I like to register for a race as soon as I finish one. Gotta have those goals ahead of you
    Love your biking picture - screams FALL!!!!!

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  34. Congrats again!!!! I cannot seem to kick the blues ass lately!!! I love reading blogs they seem to perk me up a little. Your co-workers are so sweet to decorate like that. It is so beautiful where you live. Have a great day
    bakingrunner.blogspot.com

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    1. I hate the blues. Having goals keeps me motivated.

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  35. Great post, Wendy! I definitely agree with these - your body needs rest after a marathon just like it does, well, after a hangover. Having a return to running plan helps me, just like you suggested - it gives me something to follow, just like a training plan, but it keeps me from doing too much too soon.
    Now if all those loads of laundry could just fold themselves...

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    1. Seriously. And if the groceries could just arrive and be put away. I need a personal assistant!

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  36. I totally feel you on the race hangover..not so much in the physical sense, but in the "no one wants to hear me talk about it as much as I want to" sense ;) I used to work in a hotel and would find a way to work it into as many stories with guests as I could, haha.

    I think those are great tips for beating the post-race blues. I know it can be a tough time in the midst of those "what's next?" thoughts.

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    1. It's just so hard to come back to reality after such an awesome personal victory!

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  37. Ah, I found myself nodding in agreement while reading this. Rock star status is so fleeting! There you are, feeling on top of the world, beaming ear to ear, and other people have no idea what you just did. And you're right, you can't always share it. And many of them wouldn't understand it if you did. But of course people like us do! Congrats, rock star!

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    1. That's the funny thing, even if you share it, no one else gets it...unless they are a runner!

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  38. Oh, you are awesome! I'm so proud of you and so happy that you are on cloud 9! That is so great!

    You make a lot of great points in this piece - I never really basked in the aftermath of my marathon. I was not happy with how it all played out, and I pretty much brushed the whole thing under the rug of my memory. I do have the recap, of course, but it took quite a while to get it all out.

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    1. I hope you look back on that marathon as a huge accomplishment! No matter how it played out, you should be proud that you finished.

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  39. Oh yes, I definitely get the post marathon blues, and I think I will even more this year knowing that I'm taking a break from the marathon. Did I just say that? I don't think I've told that to anyone yet. But yea, I'm already kind of feeling those blues before the race knowing that there won't be another one for a while...is that weird?

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    1. Not all...I'm expecting to feel that way after Big Sur.

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  40. I get the post marathon blues every single time. But not without basking in the satisfaction for a few days first.

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    1. I think I do--although not as bad as I did that first time. Now I'm fighting a cold, so I'm just crabby...

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  41. OMG, my after marathon to do list is insane!!!

    I came home from RW this weekend and was like - hey, I was special there. It was hard to fall back into the role of soccer mom instead of social influencer LOL

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  42. A recap is a nice way to relive it. I apparently have fallen into a habit of having a "fun" race not long after my "real" race, so it's a nice distraction. Hope your cold gets better soon!

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    1. Me too! Hey, it's par for the marathon course, right?

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  43. You. Are. Ah-Mazing!! Hope you rest up and recover to kick that cold. :)

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  44. I too get post race blues. I am kinda hanging out in the blues right now. I ran a half marathon PR and feel like "what now?" I need to come up with a plan soon, but a full marathon just isn't in the cards for me.

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    1. I've got all kinds of ideas running through my head. Even though I have a plan!

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  45. Loved reading this post! You described my feelings after my first 26.2 perfectly! You've spent months training, looking forward to race day, race day comes and goes so quickly. Now what? My husband is not a runner, so there's only so much he wants to hear about my running. I too have read my recap multiple times, almost a year later. Beautiful pic on the bike! That was very sweet of your co-workers to give you a warm welcome home! Hope your recovery goes well!

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  46. Your coworkers are awesome!! I know that feeling of being back and work after a big weekend race, and wanting to share it with the world but not being able to. I can't do so in my job, either. And I think you hit the nail on the head. It's so hard because during the race, and for most of race weekend, it's all about you and complete strangers are there encouraging you and congratulating you. I think you've got some great tips on how to come down from that marathon high and keep moving forward.

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    1. It's so hard to come back to reality after such a huge accomplishment. Even today, almost 2 weeks later, I wanted to shout ( at a meeting): "Don't you know I ran another marathon, damn it?!"

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  47. I am still rungry! It's been two weeks and I am hungry all of the time. I guess I still do not fully understand why you couldn't tell people at work that you've run a marathon.

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    1. It just wouldn't be appropriate for me to tell my patients that I ran a marathon--after all they aren't there because of me, they're there because they are sick.

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